Update: Tony Nicklinson – The Fight Goes On

After suffering a stroke in 2005, Tony Nicklinson was paralysed from the neck down. He and his wife campaigned tirelessly for a change in the law on the ‘Right-To-Die” issues that prevented him from having any kind of  assisted dying.

Tony died shortly after his recent case for a change in the law was lost and now there has been another setback. It has just been announced that top High Court judges have now refused permission for this case to go to the Court of Appeal. His wife is determined to continue the battle and make an appeal about this decision which she is surprised about and describes it as a “setback”.

The BBC News reported: ‘Not the end’

Mrs Nicklinson said she was “surprised” at the decision which she described as a “setback” and said “this is not the end by any means”. She said that she will now appeal directly to the Court of Appeal.

She said: “It can happen to anyone, anyone can be fine today and tomorrow find themselves in Tony’s position. [The campaign] was for other people as well. “So much hard work has gone into to it from us, from Tony and from our legal team that it just seems a huge shame now for it to be put on hold again.”

Mr Nicklinson’s legal fight took place at the same time as that of another man with locked-in syndrome.

The second sufferer, who cannot be named for legal reasons, but is known as AM or Martin, suffered a stroke in August 2008. He was given the go-ahead for action against the Director of Public Prosecutions to be heard by appeal judges. He is unable to speak, is virtually unable to move and describes his life as “undignified, distressing and intolerable” – he wants to be allowed a “dignified suicide”. His lawyers said the High Court ruling deprived 47-year-old Martin of “the opportunity to take the necessary steps to end his own life”.[/box]

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